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CAREERS DATABASE

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers, recordkeeping

Significant Points
  • Many jobs are at the entry level and do not require more than a high school diploma.
  • Employment of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers is expected to decline because of the increased use of automated equipment that performs the function of these workers.
Nature of the Work

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment in order to keep accurate records. Most of their duties are clerical. Using either manual or automated data-processing systems, they verify the quantity, quality, and overall value of the items they are responsible for and check the condition of items purchased, sold, or produced against records, bills, invoices, or receipts. They check the items to ensure the accuracy of the recorded data. They prepare reports on warehouse inventory levels and on use of parts. Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers also check for any defects in the items and record the severity of the defects they find.

These workers use weight scales, counting devices, tally sheets, and calculators to obtain information about the products. They usually move objects to and from the scales with a handtruck or forklift. They issue receipts for the products when needed or requested.


Working Conditions

Working conditions vary considerably by employment setting. Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers work in a wide variety of businesses, institutions, and industries. Some work in warehouses, stockrooms, or shipping and receiving rooms that may not be temperature controlled. Others may spend time in cold storage rooms or on loading platforms where they are exposed to the weather.

Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement

Many weigher, measurer, checker, and sampler jobs are at the entry level and do not require more than a high school diploma. Employers, however, prefer to hire those familiar with computers. Applicants who have specific job-related experience may be preferred. Typing, filing, recordkeeping, and other clerical skills also are important. Advancement opportunities vary with the place of employment.


Employment

Weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers held about 88,000 jobs in 2004. Their employment is spread across many industries. Retail trade accounted for 20 percent of those jobs, manufacturing accounted for about 21 percent, and wholesale trade employed another 13 percent.


Job Outlook

Employment of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers is expected to decline through 2014 because of the increased use of automated equipment that performs the function of these workers. Also, many of the industries that employ these workers are expected to decrease employment. In addition to job openings resulting from job growth, openings should arise from the need to replace workers who leave the labor force or transfer to other occupations.

Earnings

Median annual earnings of weighers, measurers, checkers, and samplers in May 2004 were $24,570. The middle 50 percent earned between $19,360 and $32,560. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $16,140, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $42,190.

These workers usually receive the same benefits as most other workers. If uniforms are required, employers generally provide them or offer an allowance to purchase them.

Related Occupations

Other workers who determine and document characteristics of materials or equipment include cargo and freight agents; production, planning, and expediting clerks; shipping, receiving, and traffic clerks; stock clerks and order fillers; and procurement clerks.

Sources of Additional Information


Information about job opportunities may be obtained from local employers and local offices of the State employment service.

 

  • Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2006-07 Edition



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