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CINSAUT WINE GRAPE



Cinsaut or Cinsault (pronounced "san-so") is a red wine grape, whose heat tolerance and productivity make it important in Languedoc-Roussillon and the former French colonies of Algeria and Morocco. It is often blended with grapes such as Grenache and Carignane to add softness and bouquet.[1]  


Wine description lighter, brighter color than most of the heavier red wines, sweet, soft taste --strawberry-cherry fruit character, spice on the finish
Food pairing classic bistro fair, creamy blue cheese, strawberries, Mediterranean cuisine
Origin France
Notable regions Languedoc-Roussillon, France, Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon
Notable wine(s) Chatea Musar (Lebanon), Ostuni Ottavianello, Cinsaut, Dry Creek Valley

Cinsaut has many synonyms, of which perhaps the most confusing is its sale as a table grape called 'Oeillade', although it is different from the "true" Oeillade which is no longer cultivated. In South Africa, it was known as "Hermitage", hence the name of its most famous cross Pinotage.

History

Cinsault appears to be an ancient variety that may have originated in the Herault, but could equally have been brought by traders from the eastern Mediterranean.

Distribution and Wines

Algeria

Cinsaut is popular in Algeria for its drought resistance, and is used to make large volumes of wine.

Australia

Cinsaut is grown under a variety of names such as Black Prince, Blue Imperial, Oeillade and Ulliade

France

Cinsaut is the fourth most widely-planted grape variety in France, and is especially important in Languedoc-Roussillon.

Italy

Known as Ottavianello, there is one tiny DOC devoted to Cinsaut - Ostuni Ottavianello, with a total production of less than 1000 cases.[2] However, Cinsaut has long been used in Puglian blends, and has begun to attract the attention of winemakers interested in reviving old varieties.[3]

Lebanon

Cinsaut is an important component in the blend of Lebanon's most famous wine, Chateau Musar.

Morocco

As in Algeria, Cinsaut is popular in Morocco for its drought resistance.

South Africa

A lot of Cinsaut is grown in South Africa much of which is blended with Cabernet Sauvignon. It holds a special place in the country's viticulture along side Pinot Noir as one of the parents of Pinotage.

USA

Some Cinsaut is planted in California as Black Malvoisie.

Vine and Viticulture

The vine can produce heavy crops, but wines are much better if yields are controlled. Cinsaut is very drought resistant but can be susceptible to disease, so appreciates a dry climate. It produces large cylindrical bunches of black grapes with fairly thick skins.

See Also:

Home Wine Page
History of Wine
Classification of Wines
Science of Taste
The Science of Wine Aroma
About the Acids in Wine
Polyphenols (Tannins) in Wine
Oak in Wines
The Basic Wine Pairing Rules
Science of Food and Wine Pairing
Sugars in Wine
About Wine Tasting
Wine Tasting Terms
Storage of Wine
Aging of Wine
Wine Acessories
Headaches from Wine
About a Wine Sommelier

References

  1. Robinson, Jancis Vines, Grapes & Wines Mitchell Beazley 1986
  2. Ministero delle Politiche Agricole Alimentari e Forestale, Banca Dati Vini DOC, DOCG :: Ostuni Ottavianello (Italian))
  3. www.diwinetaste.com, Accademia dei Racemi
  4. Maul, E.; Eibach, R. (1999-06-00). "Vitis International Variety Catalogue". Information and Coordination Centre for Biological Diversity (IBV) of the Federal Agency for Agriculture and Food (BLE), Deichmanns Aue 29, 53179 Bonn, Germany. http://www.genres.de/idb/vitis/. Retrieved 2007-04-22. 

See Also: Forgottengrapes.com -- Cinsault

Some or all of this text has been obtained from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License (see Copyrights for details). Disclaimers. Wikipedia is powered by MediaWiki, an open source wiki engine.

 

 



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